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Froghall planning application - latest updates

12 July 2021 - 3:54pm
Froghall planning application - latest updates CUCT Mon, 12/07/2021 - 15:54

The developer recently submitted a number of fairly detailed additional documents rubbishing the viability of the restoration and suggesting that it can be ignored, or that the restored canal could take a different route through Froghall. Unfortunately this is broadly untrue. The canal could not drop into the river through the area as it is too narrow, windy and fast flowing, even under normal conditions. It also regularly floods and at time this can be 2m or more. The river sections of the Caldon Canal at Consall and at Crumpwood on the Uttoxeter Canal were able to be made navigable because the river is much wider and deeper, and the valley flatter, so the flow is much slower. It is unfortunate that basic details like this were not checked with us by the applicant.

The Trust would be more than happy to discuss any aspects of the proposal, including a small deviation for the line of the canal, which would simplify the crossing under the A52. Indeed the Trust first suggested this more than a decade ago, and raised it again when the Chunet Valley Masterplan was being developed. Unfortunately to date the developer has chosen not to talk with the Trust on the details of this application other than to use our 2009 feasibility study and other documentation which have been very selectively quoted in an attempt to justify their proposal to build on the line of the canal. The Trust is supportive of the principle of regeneration in Froghall, which remains the terminus of the Caldon Canal and as such is a destination for visitors arriving along both the canal and nearby railway. Appropriate redevelopment would bring significant benefits, clean up an eyesore whilst dealing with this heavily contaminated post-industrial area.

As a result of the new documents submitted, and also for scheduling reasons the application committee date has been put back a number of times. The window for comments is extended each time the date changes, so at present people can respond on the website until 27th July, with the application currently due to go to committee on 12th August. Here's the link to the main application.

We are nudging towards 300 objections at present, both from local people and the wider waterways community. There are some really good points in the recent CRT and IWA responses that people might want to refer to, both written after consultation with ourselves and we fully endorse everything that has been said. Scroll to the bottom of the page to see the most recent submissions and responses.

As well as our specific interest in the canal there are other very good planning reasons why this application should be opposed. You can read more about these in many of the responses to the application but the main points are the failure to deal with severe ground contamination, the lack of infrastructure and public transport in Froghall, over-development of a rural village contrary to the local plan, loss of historic open space and harm to the setting of the listed building. These are just a few of the reasons which we have cause to believe that this application must be rejected.

We were recently fortunate in getting the support of David and Sheila Suchet, and our press release made the front page lead in the local paper a couple of weeks ago, as well as being picked up in media elsewhere. Thanks to them and indeed to everyone for your support, we are far from done and dusted on this and every bit of support is helpful.


Steve Wood
Chairman, Caldon & Uttoxeter Canals Trust

Poirot Actor Sir David Suchet condemns Froghall developers’ lack of vision for Uttoxeter Canal restoration

29 June 2021 - 9:29pm
Poirot Actor Sir David Suchet condemns Froghall developers’ lack of vision for Uttoxeter Canal restoration CUCT Tue, 29/06/2021 - 21:29

Sir David and Lady Suchet have joined Staffordshire Moorlands residents, parish councils and canal volunteers in voicing their concerns about development proposals that would prevent further restoration of the Uttoxeter Canal at Froghall and kill opportunities to extend safe walking and cycling routes, create wildlife corridors and grow sustainable tourism.

Actor David Suchet, world renowned as Agatha Christie’s detective Poirot, is passionate about canals and rivers, their history and the environmental, well-being and economic benefits they offer. He has a strong interest in waterway restoration schemes throughout the UK; horrified to learn what is at risk in the Churnet Valley, he contacted the Caldon & Uttoxeter Canals Trust.

Now Sir David and Lady Sheila Suchet add their voices to hundreds who have written to object to a planning application that would see an executive housing development built at Froghall, effectively severing the derelict Uttoxeter Canal from linking into the Caldon Canal and onward to the inland waterways network. The scheme for 49 houses on the land between Froghall basin and the A52 covers the route of the historic canal. It has been drawn up as further down the Churnet Valley volunteers are hard at work uncovering the waterway’s rich heritage, restoring structures and managing the environment in consultation with wildlife experts and landowners.

Sir David explains, “The waterways of Britain have been an important part of my life since my wife and I bought our first narrowboat back in 1974. Over the years, it has been a privilege to lend my support to restoration societies across the UK. These groups work tirelessly to bring rivers and canals back to their former glory in order to protect our heritage. As Vice Presidents of the Inland Waterways Association that protects and restores Britain’s canals and navigable rivers - and also of Staffordshire’s Lichfield & Hatherton Canals Restoration Trust – we have experienced working alongside restoration volunteers firsthand. I have learned just how many years these restoration projects can take to progress and the value of milestone projects along the way.”

Focussing on the Staffordshire Moorlands, residents may remember how the volunteers of the Caldon Canal Society fought to bring the Caldon Canal back to life in 1974 after it fell derelict in the 1960s. Another restoration milestone was delivered in 2005 when the first lock and basin of the Uttoxeter Canal at Froghall were reopened - a £625k project delivered by the Society’s volunteers working in partnership with British Waterways and local authorities and backed by the European Regional Development Fund and Single Regeneration Budget.

The volunteer charity then changed its name to the Caldon and Uttoxeter Canals Trust (CUCT) looking to preserve the line of the Uttoxeter Canal and maintain in good order the structures and lengths of canal that still exist. In 2009, with the support of Staffordshire County Council, a study was undertaken that concluded the restoration of the canal is feasible.

The Uttoxeter Canal restoration achieved more milestones when CUCT became part of the Churnet Valley Living Landscape Partnership, delivering record numbers of volunteering days which helped release over £2 million of the National Lottery Heritage Fund and other charitable funding. CUCT volunteers reinstated traditional cast iron mileposts to form the basis of a Uttoxeter Canal heritage trail through the Churnet Valley and onward to Uttoxeter itself. They also restored Bridge 70, the last standing stone bridge over the canal between Alton and Denstone, which carries a well-used public footpath. This was achieved with the support of Staffordshire Moorlands District Council who carried out a compulsory purchase order on the bridge before work could take place as no owner could be identified. The bridge was then sold to CUCT for a nominal sum.

The Trust’s volunteers continue to work in this section of the Churnet Valley conserving more of the canal’s structure, uncovering towpaths loved by walkers and creating a thriving wildlife corridor through careful woodland management - all supported by the RSPB and landowners.

David Suchet is distraught that the landowners proposing the development at Froghall cannot see the consequences of their current plans. He explains: “I worked on IWA’s “Waterways in Progress” report which describes how restoration schemes are not just a means to an end; they have a life of their own and can bring quantifiable benefits at every stage! New towpaths for walking and cycling have wellbeing benefits. So does participating in the restoration itself, along with bringing opportunities to develop new skills and friendships. New community places bring people together and build a sense of pride. Enhancing heritage and wildlife habitats in turn delivers environmental benefits for all. Restoration can go hand in hand with regeneration and tourism that helps boost the local economy; evidence suggests that developers can benefit from a 15-20% uplift in value of waterside properties by incorporating a restored canal into plans for a site!”

Steve Wood is chairman of the Caldon & Uttoxeter Canals Trust and describes what else the Trust has been working on: “We have been exploring creating a walking and cycling route along the length of the Uttoxeter Canal utilising as much of the original towpath as possible, particularly between Froghall Basin and Oakamoor as much of the canal exists alongside the old railway route. Studies show this would be a very good opportunity to improve accessibility and connectivity within the Churnet Valley and make a high contribution to sustainable tourism. These studies form the evidence base of the SMDC Local Plan adopted in September 2020.

“We were devastated to see this planning application submitted without being invited by the developer to explore how the Uttoxeter Canal corridor could be used to enhance the potential of the whole site at this critical Froghall gateway between the Caldon Canal conservation area and the Churnet Valley. Their application argues that the Churnet Valley Master Plan is only a Supplementary Planning Document for guidance. However there is clear basis in the main adopted SMDC Local Plan for expecting development of this site to make proper provision for the future restoration of the Uttoxeter Canal – and the SMDC planning committee must have regard for this when they make their decision.”

Sir David agrees: “I urge the landowners and developers to look around Britain’s inland waterways to see the magic that can be created by visionary groups of volunteers and the charities who are determined to make a difference to our waterways. Any development should not prejudice potential reinstatement of the route of the Uttoxeter Canal.”

Images - used by permission
  • David Suchet as Poirot © ITC PLC 2020
  • Sir David & Lady Sheila Suchet afloat © David Suchet
  • David Suchet steering narrowboat © Waterway Images

Volunteer work party

23 June 2021 - 12:01am
Volunteer work party CUCT Wed, 23/06/2021 - 00:01

After a very long break due to COVID, we are tentatively making a start with work parties again on Friday, 25th June, with a Himalayan Balsam bashing session near to Bridge 70 at Crumpwood.

We do have some COVID-related restrictions on the activity with the obvious one being that we will need to meet on site, not in Denstone as we cannot allow people to share vehicles unless they have arrived together. As regular volunteers will know, we cannot cope with more than a couple of vehicles on site so we ask attendees to walk from either Denstone or Alton if you are able to.

Meet on site at Bridge 70 at 10am having made your own way on foot. The site is a little over a mile walk down the old railway track from either Denstone or Alton. When you see the new section of towpath next to milepost 23, walk down this to the bridge. Please contact me if you need to bring a vehicle to site. We will need to ensure that access for South Staffs Water vehicles is maintained throughout the day, so may need to turn people back if too many vehicles turn up.

The session will run from 10 - 3, please bring your own lunch and drinks, if staying for the day. You are more than welcome to come for just an hour or two if you want to. Please bring your own gloves if you can. We will not be handing out hi-viz jackets or asking volunteers to sign in on this occasion, though I will be recording emergency contact numbers for everyone as they arrive. Please note that there are no refreshment facilities or toilets on site, as we do not have use of the SSW toilet at the Weir on this occasion.

If you have any questions please phone me, Steve Wood, on 07976 805858 or email steve.wood@waterways.org.uk

Uttoxeter Canal update

22 June 2021 - 10:17am
Uttoxeter Canal update

Dear all

It's been a while since I have been in touch but as you may have already seen on social media we are tentatively making a start with work parties again this Friday, 25th June, with a Himalayan Balsam bashing session near to Bridge 70  at Crumpwood. We joined an enjoyable evening session on the Caldon at Deep Hayes led by Canal & River Trust last week and are hoping that some of their volunteers will join us for this session as well.

This will be a fairly easy way to get us back into the swing, where we can easily maintain social distancing and not need to use or share tools. It would be great to see as many of you as possible, not least so that we can discuss what sort of activities people are keen and comfortable to do in future months. I'd also appreciate comments on when people would like to do work parties. My own work-related availability means that I can only run them on Monday or Friday for the foreseeable future. Which would suit you best? Conversely, would anyone else like to offer themselves up to lead the group on other days of the week? it would be great if we could get back to doing work parties several times a month, especially as we start to catch up on vegetation management after more than a year away from the site.

We do have some COVID-related restrictions on Friday's activity with the obvious one being that we will need to meet on site, not in Denstone as we cannot allow people to share vehicles unless they have arrived together. As regular volunteers will know, we cannot cope with more than a couple of vehicles on site so we ask attendees to walk from either Denstone or Alton if you are able to.

Meet on site at Bridge 70 at 10am having made your own way on foot. The site is a little over a mile walk down the old railway track from either Denstone or Alton. When you see the new section of towpath next to milepost 23, walk down this to the bridge. Please contact me if you need to bring a vehicle to site. We will need to ensure that access for South Staffs Water vehicles is maintained throughout the day, so may need to turn people back if too many vehicles turn up.

Please bring your own gloves if you can. We will not be handing out hi-viz jackets on this occasion

The session will run from 10 - 3, please bring your own lunch and drinks, if staying for the day. You are more than welcome to come for just an hour or two if you want to. If you have any questions please phone me, Steve Wood, on 07976 805858 or email steve.wood@waterways.org.uk.

Froghall housing

We've had lots of questions about the Froghall planning application, which has been deferred a number of times and has now been pushed back to the July committee meeting. The applicant has recently submitted over 50 pages of new documentation dismissing the viability of restoring the canal and suggesting a number of rather unlikely alternative routes through Froghall. We are still working on our response to this, which will be added to our website in the next few days.

You can of course still respond to the latest documents online or by sending an email to the local authority planning@staffsmoorlands.gov.uk. Scroll down past over 250 objections, to the bottom of the page and look at the documents dated 03/06/2021.

Note there are two applications, the main planning application, SMD/2020/0684 and related listed building consent, SMD/2020/0685, but you can send a single email to comment on both. The key one to respond to is the planning application.

Comments should be in by 29th June, which is a week today, but we would not be surprised if the submission deadline was extended again.

Best regards
Steve

CUCT Tue, 22/06/2021 - 10:17

Bringing the Uttoxeter Canal Back to Life

13 March 2021 - 1:16am
Bringing the Uttoxeter Canal Back to Life

Steve Wood, Chairman of the Caldon & Uttoxeter Canals Trust tells how the canal came to be built, why it closed less than 40 years later, and progress made by volunteers who started restoring the canal in 2002.

Recording of Zoom talk, 12th March 2021.

CUCT Sat, 13/03/2021 - 01:16

Bringing the Uttoxeter Canal Back to Life (illustrated talk)

9 March 2021 - 8:46am
Bringing the Uttoxeter Canal Back to Life (illustrated talk)

Dear all

This Friday evening I will be giving an online talk, looking at how the Uttoxeter Canal came to be built, why it closed less than 40 years later, and progress made by volunteers who started restoring the canal in 2002. With so much recent discussion about the future of the restoration, due to the proposals which would block the line of the canal in Froghall, it is an interesting time to look back at what has been achieved so far on the Uttoxeter Canal.

Register for free in advance (numbers are limited) https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0hUo3HsQToWF8DtF1ct-PA

Thank you to those you you who have been in touch, or have already responded to the planning applications at Froghall. A significant number of objections have been registered so far, but that is no reason for us to be complacent, as there are also supportive responses from those keen to see the brownfield parts of this site regenerated, and who perhaps do not understand the implications for our project. If you have a few minutes you can respond to the applications online or by sending an email to the local authority planning@staffsmoorlands.gov.uk. Note there are two applications, the main planning application, SMD/2020/0684 and related listed building consent, SMD/2020/0685, but you can send a single email to comment on both.

There are a couple of news articles on our website about the application which you may wish to consult before responding by following this link. I'm happy to respond to any questions, which you can send by simply replying to this email.

Comments need to be in by 23rd March, so around a fortnight.

Best regards
Steve

CUCT Tue, 09/03/2021 - 08:46

Bringing the Uttoxeter Canal Back to Life (illustrated talk)

9 March 2021 - 8:36am
Bringing the Uttoxeter Canal Back to Life (illustrated talk) CUCT Tue, 09/03/2021 - 08:36

Steve Wood, Chairman of the Caldon & Uttoxeter Canals Trust tells how the canal came to be built, why it closed less than 40 years later, and progress made by volunteers who started restoring the canal in 2002.

With so much recent discussion about the future of the restoration, due to a planning application which would block the line of the canal in Froghall, it is an interesting time to look back at what has been achieved so far on the Uttoxeter Canal.

Register for free in advance (numbers are limited) https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0hUo3HsQToWF8DtF1ct-PA

Froghall planning application reviewed by the Trust

27 February 2021 - 9:35am
Froghall planning application reviewed by the Trust CUCT Sat, 27/02/2021 - 09:35

As reported recently, a planning application has recently been submitted for land directly south of the basin at the start of the Uttoxeter Canal in Froghall. This application puts 48 new houses between the basin and nearby A52 (note not 49 as previously reported, the 49th property is the refurbished listed farmhouse.) This development would block the historic line of the canal, destroy physical remains of the canal both on the surface and underground, and does not provide space for an alternative alignment. This application directly contravenes both adopted planning policy documents for this area, the Churnet Valley Masterplan and Staffordshire Moorlands Local Plan, which reserve the line of the canal for a potential restoration, and in the shorter term for the safe walking route from the canal basin to the A52 which the Trust has lobbied for since 2005.

We have now had time to read the application in more detail. The significance of the Uttoxeter Canal and the opportunity for restoration is played down throughout the application. In the heritage statement it is described as a "non-designated heritage asset - has (as yet unproven) archaeological value" which came as something of a surprise to the Trust not least as Historic England record the canal as a monument, but also because detailed maps recording the line of the canal from Froghall to Uttoxeter were supplied to Staffordshire County Council, at their request, specifically for the purpose of updating the Historic Environment Record around a decade ago.

Over £700,000 has already been granted by various bodies towards restoring the canal, most of this being spent in Froghall itself reopening the first lock and basin directly adjacent to the present application site. The heritage statement of the present application comments that "While there is no remaining surface evidence of the old canal, the area has been purposely left largely undeveloped in order to retain vistas across the site" which might more accurately be restated as "It is proposed to flatten at section of canal which shows at surface level, eliminate the site of lock 3 and lay a road down the line of the canal." The only section of the application area that is not redeveloped in these proposals is Lock 2, which it is impossible to build on because of the topography of that part of the site.

Froghall before work started, 2002

 

The application plays down the opportunity to restore the canal, doing a huge disservice to volunteers who have contributed huge amounts of time working on the canal since 2003. The Trust estimates that around 32,000 hours of volunteer labour have so far been contributed to our long term vision to restore the canal. We do not flinch from saying this is a long term aspiration. Volunteer-led projects of this size and complexity often take many years to deliver. There are examples across the country of ultimately successful canal restorations which have taken decades to complete. Many have had more complex engineering challenges than the Uttoxeter Canal, which while it was one of the earliest canal closures, in 1849, was largely abandoned rather than being built upon as far as Denstone, other than in the village centres. The 2009 restoration feasibility study confirmed that there were no insurmountable problems to reinstating the canal, largely along its original line between Froghall and Denstone. A new line for the canal would be needed from here to Uttoxeter, which whilst not technically complex should not be tackled until the restoration of the first half of the canal nears completion.

Waterway Recovery Group and local volunteers at Froghall on opening day of the first lock and basin, 2005

 

The application states that "a future restoration is unlikely to be viable within the site layout proposed." For absolute clarity, restoration is not made "unlikely" by this application, it permanently ends any opportunity to reinstate the Uttoxeter Canal. The only link to the outside canal network is through this site and without the potential of an eventual a connection to the national waterways network the restoration is not fundable. It is also extremely unlikely that the Trust could attract the number of volunteers from the national waterways restoration community that have so strongly supported the project over many years.

New towpath beside the Uttoxeter Canal at Bridge 70, February 2018

 

The Trust strongly encourages all who are interested in the restoration of the Uttoxeter Canal, or indeed any of the related footpath and environmental improvements which have been undertaken or are proposed, to look at the planning application, SMD/2020/0684 and related listed building consent, SMD/2020/0685, and to respond to these. The Trust will be opposing the application in its own comprehensive response in due course and a significant number of early responses supporting our view would be incredibly helpful. Our ideal outcome would be that this application is withdrawn before the closing date and resubmitted in a form which does not block the line of the canal. This essentially means only building on the land designated for housing in the local plan, and we would have no objection to this. Responses need to be submitted via the Staffordshire Moorlands District Council website by 17th March.

Proposed housing at Froghall would permanently block the Uttoxeter Canal restoration

22 February 2021 - 12:05pm
Proposed housing at Froghall would permanently block the Uttoxeter Canal restoration

Dear all

A planning application has recently been submitted for land directly south of the basin at the start of the Uttoxeter Canal in Froghall. This application puts 49 new houses between the basin and nearby A52. Based on the information provided we can confirm that, if approved, the development would block all possible alignments for the canal through Froghall, and would permanently end our ongoing project to restore the Uttoxeter Canal. It would remove the opportunity to attract funding and support for improvements not only in Froghall but also the 7 miles of canal between there and Denstone, and would end ongoing volunteer-led works in the Alton and Crumpwood areas. The proposal contravenes both the adopted Churnet Valley Masterplan and the Staffordshire Moorlands Local Plan as it destroys the line of the canal, which is a nationally recognised historic monument. Both the planning documents record the route of the canal in Froghall and support restoration as a long term aspiration, with a pedestrian route from the canal basin to the A52, down the original towpath, as a short term goal.

The first lock and basin of the Uttoxeter Canal were reopened in 2005, in a £625k partnership project between volunteers, British Waterways, local and regional authorities, backed by the European Regional Development Fund. The 2009 restoration feasibility study demonstrated that the line of the canal from Froghall as far as Denstone was largely extant and could be restored with minimal deviations from the original line in Oakamoor and Alton, and in a few places where it was crossed by the later railway line. New alignments for the canal in all these locations have been identified. In 2012, the Trust began restoration works further down the canal between Alton and Denstone, in a £105k project supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund (now National Lottery Heritage Fund) as the single largest project in the £2m Churnet Valley Living Landscape Partnership. This grant was used to restore Bridge 70, clear the line of the canal and towpath in that area, laying 250m of new towpath in the process. Since then volunteers have cleared an additional 1.5km of towpath and have uncovered the site of three locks and other heritage structures along the line of the canal, including the grade II listed and unique Crumpwood Weir, where boats previously crossed the River Churnet.

The Trust strongly encourages all who are interested in the restoration of the Uttoxeter Canal, or indeed any of the related footpath and environmental improvements which have been undertaken or are proposed, to look at the application, SMD/2020/0684, and to respond to it. The Trust will be opposing the application in its own comprehensive response in due course and a significant number of early responses supporting our view would be incredibly helpful. Our ideal outcome would be that this application is withdrawn before the closing date and resubmitted in a form which does not block the line of the canal. This essentially means only building on the land designated for housing in the local plan, and we would have no objection to this. Responses need to be submitted via the Staffordshire Moorlands District Council website by 17th March.
 
Thank you for your support.

Steve Wood
Chairnan

CUCT Mon, 22/02/2021 - 12:05

Proposed housing at Froghall would permanently block the Uttoxeter Canal restoration

22 February 2021 - 10:14am
Proposed housing at Froghall would permanently block the Uttoxeter Canal restoration CUCT Mon, 22/02/2021 - 10:14

A planning application has recently been submitted for land directly south of the basin at the start of the Uttoxeter Canal in Froghall. This application puts 49 new houses between the basin and nearby A52. Based on the information provided we can confirm that, if approved, the application would block all possible alignments for the canal through Froghall, and would permanently end our ongoing project to restore the Uttoxeter Canal. This development would remove the opportunity to attract funding and support for improvements not only in Froghall but also the 7 miles of canal between there and Denstone, and would end ongoing volunteer-led works in the Alton and Crumpwood areas. The proposal contravenes both the adopted Churnet Valley Masterplan and the Staffordshire Moorlands Local Plan as it destroys the line of the canal, which is a nationally recognised historic monument. Both the planning documents record the route of the canal in Froghall and support restoration as a long term aspiration, with a pedestrian route from the canal basin to the A52, down the original towpath, as a short term goal.

The first lock and basin of the Uttoxeter Canal were reopened in 2005, in a £625k partnership project between volunteers, British Waterways, local and regional authorities, backed by the European Regional Development Fund. The 2009 restoration feasibility study demonstrated that the line of the canal from Froghall as far as Denstone was largely extant and could be restored with minimal deviations from the original line in Oakamoor and Alton, and in a few places where it was crossed by the later railway line. New alignments for the canal in all these locations have been identified. In 2012, the Trust began restoration works further down the canal between Alton and Denstone, in a £105k project supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund (now National Lottery Heritage Fund) as the single largest project in the £2m Churnet Valley Living Landscape Partnership. This grant was used to restore Bridge 70, clear the line of the canal and towpath in that area, laying 250m of new towpath in the process. Since then volunteers have cleared an additional 1.5km of towpath and have uncovered the site of three locks and other heritage structures along the line of the canal, including the grade II listed and unique Crumpwood Weir, where boats previously crossed the River Churnet.

The Trust strongly encourages all who are interested in the restoration of the Uttoxeter Canal, or indeed any of the related footpath and environmental improvements which have been undertaken or are proposed, to look at the application, SMD/2020/0684, and to respond to it. The Trust will be opposing the application in its own comprehensive response in due course and a significant number of early responses supporting our view would be incredibly helpful. Our ideal outcome would be that this application is withdrawn before the closing date and resubmitted in a form which does not block the line of the canal. This essentially means only building on the land designated for housing in the local plan, and we would have no objection to this. Responses need to be submitted via the Staffordshire Moorlands District Council website by 17th March.
 
Thank you for your support.

Steve Wood
Chairnan

Alton Lock

13 September 2020 - 12:13am
Alton Lock CUCT Sun, 13/09/2020 - 00:13

Charlesworth Lock

12 September 2020 - 11:57pm
Charlesworth Lock CUCT Sat, 12/09/2020 - 23:57

Uttoxeter Canal self-guided walk

12 September 2020 - 7:32am
Uttoxeter Canal self-guided walk

Dear Uttoxeter Canal supporter

I sent an email a few days ago but it is clear that it did not reach everyone on our mailing list and I do want to be sure that everyone has seen this, so apologies if you saw the previous version.

I want to let you know that tomorrow we will be hosting a small event on the Uttoxeter Canal. As part of the national Heritage Open Days event we are encouraging our supporters to take a self-guided walk along the Uttoxeter Canal, starting at either Alton or Denstone, as you wish. Members of the Trust will be waiting in the Crumpwood area to talk about some of the history and features of the canal and to explain work that has recently taken place, from a safe distance.

Image Bridge 70 during volunteer-led restoration

Additionally, in association with Lichfield Waterworks Trust, there will be a rare opportunity to see inside the historic pumping station at Crumpwood Weir. A fish pass was recently installed beneath this building and some of the original pumping gear removed as part of this project will be visible.

There is additional information on the new CUCT website. You might want to print this or have a smartphone available during your visit. For practical and social distancing reasons we cannot have Trust volunteers at all the sites of interest but there will be notices with information, some of which have QR code links to additional information on the website.

Access

Access to the sites is along the former railway track. Walk along the line from either Alton or Denstone until reaching milepost 23, roughly half way between the two villages. The walk from Alton is slightly shorter, but there is a good walk with things to see whichever direction you come from. Follow the signs and relaid towpath from here to the bridge, lock, weir and pumping station. Signposts will be in place and volunteers will be on hand to talk to visitors from a safe distance.

The weather forecast is good so why not enjoy the opportunity for a walk in the beautiful Churnet Valley and to see some of our projects.

Best regards
Steve

PS Also I suspect that the message may have reached a few people who were no longer on the mailing list so I apologise if you are one of these. I moved the website to new software recently and it seems that the routine that copied users from the old site did not distinguish between present and former subscribers, but it did exclude subscribers who joined the first version of this mailing list. You can use the unsubscribe link at the bottom of this email to remove yourself from these occasional messages if you want to, though you are of course welcome to stay and receive occasional updates about the Uttoxeter Canal.

CUCT Sat, 12/09/2020 - 07:32

Denstone

11 September 2020 - 10:12pm
Denstone CUCT Fri, 11/09/2020 - 22:12

Alton spill weir

11 September 2020 - 10:08pm
Alton spill weir CUCT Fri, 11/09/2020 - 22:08

Crumpwood Weir

11 September 2020 - 9:35pm
Crumpwood Weir CUCT Fri, 11/09/2020 - 21:35

Carrington’s Lock

11 September 2020 - 9:16pm
Carrington’s Lock CUCT Fri, 11/09/2020 - 21:16

Alton Tunnel

11 September 2020 - 7:42pm
Alton Tunnel CUCT Fri, 11/09/2020 - 19:42

Bridge 70

11 September 2020 - 7:21pm
Bridge 70 CUCT Fri, 11/09/2020 - 19:21

Uttoxeter Canal self-guided walk

9 September 2020 - 11:06pm
Uttoxeter Canal self-guided walk

Dear all

It has been several months since I was last in touch and our volunteer work parties have not yet resumed, but I am writing to let you know that this coming weekend we will be hosting a small event on the Uttoxeter Canal.

Members from the Trust will be waiting at key points along the canal between Denstone and Alton to talk about some of the history and features of the canal and to explain work that has recently taken place, from a safe distance.

Additionally, in association with Lichfield Waterworks Trust, there will be a rare opportunity to see inside the historic pumping station at Crumpwood Weir. A fish pass was recently installed beneath this building and some of the original pumping gear removed as part of this project will be visible.

We are hoping to have some good news for supporters who attend on Sunday, but it is a little premature to add it to this newsletter, so I do hope that some of you can make it to the site.

This event is being run in association with Heritage Open Days. There is additional information on the new CUCT website. A more detailed guide to the sites will be available via the website on the evening before the event. You might want to print this or have a copy available on a smartphone, to read as you visit.

Access

Access to the sites is along the former railway track. This is mostly grassed but can be a bit wet, depending on the weather, though at the time of writing the forecast is looking kind. it is approximately half an hour walk from either Alton or Denstone to Crumpwood.

Walk along the line from either Alton or Denstone until reaching milepost 23, roughly half way between the two villages. Follow the signs and relaid towpath from here to the bridge, lock, weir and pumping station. Signposts will be in place and volunteers will be on hand to guide visitors. There is an additional site closer to Alton, also accessed from the railway line and three mileposts along the route, all of which will be signposted with information provided, but will not manned.

Best regards
Steve

CUCT Wed, 09/09/2020 - 23:06

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